Nuts...Good Or Bad?

Nuts…Good or Bad?

Today I want to tell you about a healthy snack that may not only satisfy your late-night cravings, but also help you control your appetite, boost your metabolism, and torch more body fat. So, what is it, you ask?

Nuts!

You may think I’m “nuts” because nuts are high in fat and calories, but nuts are resistant to digestion. In fact, as much as 20% of the calories from nuts never gets absorbed by the body—not to mention that eating fat does NOT make you fat.5,6

What’s more, researchers from Purdue have found that snacking on nuts suppresses hunger, promotes satiety, leads to reductions calorie intake, and promotes increased energy expenditure. Researchers also believe that the sensory characteristics of nuts—specifically the fact that they’re crunchy—also have satiety value. In other words, the mechanical aspect of chewing nuts sends a signal to your body that you’re full and satisfied.

Even better, regular nut consumption has been shown to boost metabolism by as much as 11% and increase fat burning by up to 50%! What’s more, consumption of nuts typically results in fewer calories consumed later in the day. In fact, studies estimate that upwards of three-quarters of the calories contributed by nuts is compensated by lower subsequent energy intake.

Like olives and avocados, nuts are rich in monounsaturated fats (MUFAs), which are known for their heart health benefits. They also contain a specific MUFA called oleic acid, which seems to have a potent impact on appetite regulation, weight management, and blood lipids.

Overall, a collection of observational studies suggests that folks who regularly consume nuts have a healthier body weight than non-consumers. Even more, clinical trials have consistently found that the inclusion of nuts in the diet leads to greater compliance and weight loss compared to when nuts are excluded.

So, enjoy some nuts; almonds, cashews, pecans, pistachios (with built-in portion control when you choose those in a shell), and walnuts are great choices. And remember, eat slowly; the simple act of chewing generates important satiety signals and increases calorie burn!

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